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Kiwanis celebrates Roger Moore for his lasting impact on protecting children

| May 23, 2017

Known around the world as British spy James Bond, Kiwanis club members knew Roger Moore as an advocate for children and the recipient of the World Service Medal in 2001. He served as honorary chairman of the Worldwide Service Project to end iodine deficiency disorders, a global project undertaken by Kiwanis in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Moore served as honorary chairperson of the Kiwanis World Service Project to end iodine deficiency disorders Moore was also UNICEF’s special ambassador for the film arts. Both platforms allowed him to highlight the needs and wants of children. Moore, 89, died May 23 in Switzerland.

He became interested in Kiwanis and its mission to serve the children of the world in 1993 when he accepted the World Service Medal on behalf of the late actress and UNICEF ambassador Audrey Hepburn.

Attending the Kiwanis International Convention in Nice, France, Moore remarked, “What a difference a single human being can make … What a legacy for one person to leave. What a lesson for all of us to learn.” One year after that convention, Moore began his service as honorary chairman of the Worldwide Service Project and helped raise US$91 million to end iodine deficiency, the world’s leading cause of preventable mental disorders.

Moore served as honorary chairperson of the Kiwanis World Service Project to end iodine deficiency disorders “Roger Moore was an incredibly successful ambassador for UNICEF during our IDD Worldwide Service Project years,” noted Stan Soderstrom, executive director of Kiwanis International. “Roger was a regular at many of our annual Kiwanis International conventions, and was most gracious as he interacted with our members and always took time to pose for photos with them.” 

An April 2001 Kiwanis International magazine story noted that Moore attended seven Kiwanis International conventions, encouraging efforts on behalf of the world’s children.

At the 1995 Kiwanis International Convention in Las Vegas, Moore said, “In a very short time, the progress that has been made has proved that iodine deficiency disorders are problems that can be solved. With your continued hard work and dedication, you will make what seemed impossible become reality.” 

Roger Moore served as the honorary chairman of the Kiwanis Worldwide Service Project to eliminate IDD. He hosted a brunch at the 83rd Kiwanis International Convention in Montreal, Quebec, in 1998. He also spoke at a club fundraiser in Ottawa, Ontario, hosted a United States Congressional reception to talk about IDD and Kiwanis and addressed experts at the worldwide Salt 200 Symposium in The Hague, the Netherlands, all to promote Kiwanis’ mission to serve children and save them from iodine deficiency. 

At the 1997 Kiwanis International Convention, Moore said, “Children are precious beings, and we have promised to protect them. We will win this battle against IDD. And what a glorious day it will be when everyone in the Kiwanis/UNICEF family can say we met the challenge head-on: We rid the world of IDD. And best of all, we did it for the children.”  

Roger Moore served as the honorary chairperson of the Kiwanis Worldwide Service Project to eliminate IDD UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake noted the world lost a great friend who was a passionate and persuasive advocate for children. Moore was nominated for the World Service Medal by the Kiwanis Club of Meridian Hills in Indianapolis, and received a US$10,000 grant allowing him to work on behalf of the world’s children.

A limited edition James Bond poster sold in 2001 earned more than US$15,000 for the IDD program. The autographed posters promoted the film, “The Spy who Loved Me,” and sold for $100, with 30 percent going to the IDD campaign. The posters were numbered, and 001 and 007 each raised US$1,000 during an auction at the Kiwanis International Convention in June of 2000 in Miami Beach, Florida.  



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